Biodiv Sci ›› 2014, Vol. 22 ›› Issue (2): 208-215.DOI: 10.3724/SP.J.1003.2014.13160

• Orginal Article • Previous Articles     Next Articles

The influence of fire disturbance on the biotype structure and seasonal dynamics of ground-dwelling spider on Cangshan Mountain, Yunnan Province

Yanyan Ma1, Zizhong Yang2, Ping Feng1, Qiao Li1,*()   

  1. 1 College of Forestry, Southwest Forestry University, Kunming, Yunnan 650224
    2 Key Laboratory of Medical Insects and Spiders Resources for Development & Utilization of Yunnan Province, Dali University, Dali 671000
  • Received:2013-07-12 Accepted:2014-02-20 Online:2014-03-20 Published:2014-04-03
  • Contact: Li Qiao

Abstract:

In order to demonstrate the influence of fire disturbance on the function, structure and seasonal dynamics of ground-dwelling spider assemblages, we chose a burned site and an unburned control site. Both study sites were in broadleaf-conifer mixed forest on Cangshan Mountain, Yunnan Province. The results showed that (1) Zelotes zhui (relative dominance value (DV') =33.03), Pardosa chionophila (DV'=22.53) and Sibianor sp. 1 (DV'=8.75) were obviously dominant at the burned site and that Draconarius sp. 2 (DV'=63.50) was absolutely dominant at the control site; (2) At the burned site, the relative abundance of web-builders was significantly lower than that of hunters (P<0.001), whereas the relative abundance of web-builders was significantly higher than that of hunters at the control site; and (3) As season changed, the dominant group fluctuated significantly at the burned, with the lowest abundance during the part of the summer with the maximum rainfall and during the coldest winter; the spider assemblages were stable at the control site, with agelenids consistently the dominant group. These results indicated that fire disturbance changes the community function and structure of ground-dwelling spiders in mixed broadleaf-conifer forest in Cangshan Mountain, increases the relative abundance of hunters and reduces the stability of ground-dwelling spider assemblages.

Key words: dwelling-spider, forest fire, dominant species, life type, seasonal variation, nature reserve